Link Roundup: My Favorite Hiking Websites

Hiking Spray Park in Mt. Rainier National Park, Washington

Hiking Spray Park in Mt. Rainier National Park, Washington

I’m sure we all have our favorite websites for planning hikes; the ones we love browsing or are our first “go-to” when we decide we want to hike in a certain area.  Below are some of my favorites; please feel free to post your favorites in the comments below!

 


 

“All Over the US” Hiking Websites

Without SummitPost, remote and nearly-unknown destinations like Bonneville Pass in the Absaroka Range of Wyoming would never have entered our “must hike” list

Without SummitPost, remote and nearly-unknown destinations like Bonneville Pass in the Absaroka Range of Wyoming would never have entered our “must hike” list

SummitPost.org – great for hiking mountains just about everywhere.  There are many trails here that aren’t covered anywhere else, or at least not in enough detail to be helpful.  However, browsing is difficult; you’re better off using Google (or your favorite search engine) to browse or search this site (for example, “Grand Teton SummitPost).

ProTrails covers many destinations in the (especially Western) US, including the Peek-a-Boo Loop in Bryce Canyon, Utah

ProTrails covers many destinations in the (especially Western) US, including the Peek-a-Boo Loop in Bryce Canyon, Utah

ProTrails.com – if the trail is on the site, you’ll need no other resource.  Trail lengths, detailed GPS coordinates, helpful pictures, great write ups…it’s all here.  It’s also fairly easy to search and browse, making it a great resource.

Maple Pass Loop, North Cascades National Park, Washington – one of many trails included on the Backpacker site

Maple Pass Loop – one of many trails included on the Backpacker site

Backpacker.com – Not my favorite site (maybe because it’s slow to load and the trails tend to be 30+ miles long?), but a good place to browse.  Often trail lengths, etc., are provided…but not always.

All Trails cover much more than just hiking, including driving the River Road in Big Bend National Park, Texas

All Trails cover much more than just hiking, including driving the River Road in Big Bend National Park

AllTrails.com – This isn’t really my favorite site, but the excellent maps (accessible with free sign up) make it worth mentioning.  Trail lengths are usually too conservative and descriptions far too vague to make it an excellent resource.

 

State / Regional Hiking Websites

The WTA website directed me toward Skyline Divide on the Mt. Baker Highway, Washington

The WTA website directed me toward Skyline Divide on the Mt. Baker Highway

Washington Trail Association Website – This is my absolute, #1 favorite site for finding trails in Washington State.  I originally stumbled across the site when every single trail I’d planned to hike turned out to be snowed in…and I didn’t figure that out until less than 24 hours before we were supposed to leave!  So I spent the night frantically browsing the site for trail conditions that stated the trails were open…  But back to the present… Trails here tend to up to date and contributors regularly post as to trail and road conditions, the trailhead directions are great, and the trail mileages are fairly accurate.  The only thing I miss is more easily accessible pictures!

I found out about Lookout Mountain, Mt. Hood National Forest, Oregon, on the Oregon Hikers’ website

I found out about Lookout Mountain on the Oregon Hikers’ website

OregonHikers.org – This site is great for hiking in, well, Oregon!  Some pictures, often detailed descriptions, easy to browse.  Don’t let the site’s simple construction turn you off; it’s a quality operation.  I’ve mostly used it for the Mt. Hood area, though I got some great inspiration for southern Washington, as well.

The NW Hiker site pointed me toward the Columbia Gorge of Oregon and Washington – including Beacon Rock

The NW Hiker site pointed me toward the Columbia Gorge – including Beacon Rock

NWHiker.com – A little difficult and confusing to navigate, this site still worth the visit if hiking in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, or Washington (especially the area around the Columbia Gorge and Mt. Hood).  If you can get to a hike, the detail and pictures are good enough to not need another resource.

Colorado Guy has a lot of interesting hikes, including the social trail up Point 12812 at Independence Pass in Colorado

Colorado Guy has a lot of interesting hikes, including the social trail up Point 12812 at Independence Pass

ColoradoGuy.com – Lots of good information here about hiking in Colorado and beyond; you’ll have to browse because it’s not wonderfully laid out.  Still, there are lots of pictures, fairly accurate trail length estimates, and plenty of trails I likely wouldn’t have found elsewhere.  OK, honestly, you could plan an entire trip of Colorado hiking here without any difficulty – Not too shabby!

My favorite 14er? Mount Elbert! Colorado

My favorite 14er? Mount Elbert!

14ers.com – Great if you like climbing 14ers.  There are often several different routes detailed for each peak (choose your favorite), as well as personal experiences, loads of pictures, and accurate trail / trailhead / trail length data.

Electric Pass Peak near the Maroon Bells in Colorado is a great 13er with lovely views

Electric Pass Peak is a great 13er with lovely views

13ers.com – Sister site to the above, and with lots of pictures and trail information about trails and routes in Colorado.  Not as detailed as 14ers.com (and with far fewer trail descriptions), but still great for browsing.

 

Specific Park / Area Hiking Websites

Garnet Canyon in Grand Teton National Park is just one of the trails in the Tetons covered by Teton Hiking Trails

Garnet Canyon is just one of the trails in the Tetons covered by Teton Hiking Trails – and one of my personal favorites in the park

TetonHikingTrails.com

Views from Hallett Peak in Rocky Mountain National Park

Views from Hallett Peak in Rocky Mountain National Park

RockyMountainHikingTrails.com

Hidden Lake in Glacier National Park, Montana

Hidden Lake in Glacier National Park

HikingInGlacier.com

 

HikingInTheSmokys.com

Views of the Grand Canyon from Plateau Point off of the Bright Angel Trail – one of many hikes included on Discover The West

Views of the Grand Canyon from Plateau Point off of the Bright Angel Trail – one of many hikes included on Discover The West

DiscoverTheWest

These are all really great sites, covering (as you might expect) Grand Teton National Park, Rocky Mountain National Park, Glacier National Park, Great Smoky National Park, and beyond!  Easy to browse, and with trails ranked by feature, it’s not difficult to find something I’d like to hike.  Actually, after I started browsing the websites, I accidently met up with the creators on Google+ – and they’re great people, too!  The sites detail a lot of really cool trails, and include all the pertinent information: trail length, elevation gain, pictures, map, elevation profile, trail write-up, etc., etc., etc.

 

HaveMediaWillTravel.com – Great resource for the Wind River Range in Wyoming.  Most of her “day hikes” are upwards of 20 miles, but many can be shortened to something I’d actually do!

This wonderful site informed me that Artist Point, Yosemite National Park, California, exists!

This wonderful site informed me that Artist Point exists!

YosemiteHikes.com – Great for trails in Yosemite National Park; easy to browse, good pictures and trail descriptions.  And the games are fun, too.

Hiking up the side of Mt. Shasta toward the Ski Bowl, California

Hiking up the side of Mt. Shasta toward the Ski Bowl

HikeMtShasta.com – If you want to hike in the Mt. Shasta area, this is a great site with lots of trails, pictures, and good trail descriptions / lengths.

 

What are your “Go To” websites for planning a hiking trip?

 

This Week’s Featured Product!

 

Classic Hikes of North America: 25 Breathtaking Treks in the United States and Canada (Hardcover)


List Price: $39.95 USD
New From: $24.25 USD In Stock
Used from: $9.79 USD In Stock

 


2 thoughts on “Link Roundup: My Favorite Hiking Websites

  1. Jeff Clark

    Meanderthals: A Hiking Blog is a series of trail reports for many of the best hikes in Western North Carolina. I am fortunate to live in this beautiful environment, this “Land of Waterfalls,” and have the opportunity to day hike every week. The Blue Ridge Mountains in Pisgah National Forest rise as high as 6,600 feet, and are filled with conifer and hardwood forests, some old growth. The mountain laurel and rhododendron are plentiful, and the region fully enjoys all four seasons. Great Smoky Mountains National Park is also right around the corner with its rugged mountains, exciting wildlife, and effervescent creeks and streams. So, load your pack and join me.

  2. Pingback: The Best of Anne's Travels in 2015 - Anne's Travels

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *