Table Mountain near Mt. Baker

Views of Mt. Baker from the trail up Table Mountain, Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, Washington

Views of Mt. Baker from the trail up Table Mountain

Ok, so maybe you can’t do Ptarmigan Ridge.  You’d love to see those views, but you just can’t make such a long hike, especially over permanent snow fields.  Well, don’t despair.  There are two trails that give you similar (if not quite as intimate) views: the Artist Ridge Trail (1.5 miles RT) and the topic of this post, Table Mountain (3 miles RT).  The peak is best visited in the morning, due to the position of the mountain to Mount Baker (Baker is best in the morning, and Shuksan is best in the afternoon, at least from this part of the Mount Baker Highway).  When I did the trail, in late July after an unseasonably hot and dry few weeks, Table Mountain was still quite snowy on top, but that wasn’t an issue: simply take to the snow instead of trying to work your way through streams, mud, and encroaching snowfields on the real trail.

 

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The volcanic top of Table Mountain from near the beginning of the trail, Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, Washington

The volcanic top of Table Mountain from near the beginning of the trail

The trail begins near the large sign on the far right end of …Read More

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DIY Hard Sided Roof Top Camper

Morning in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Utah or Arizona, after a night in our hard sided roof top camper

Morning in Glen Canyon NRA after a night in our hard sided roof top camper

Or, How to Sleep On Top of Your Vehicle for Just Over $100

 

We used to sleep in a tent.  That was when we crossed the country in a big blue station wagon.  Not long after getting a full-size van, the kids figured out we could all sleep inside the van instead of sleeping in a tent (yes, it was their idea, and they loved it!).  It was fun, if a little crowded, and saved us many $$$ in camping and motel fees in the first trip alone.  However, as the group size grew, we ran out of space.  Just how many growing children and full-grown adults can you fit on the seats, on the floor, and so on of one van?

 

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In Joshua Tree National Park, California with our diy hard sided roof top camper

In Joshua Tree National Park, California

So, one very creative member of the group decided he could build us a contraption that would allow several people to sleep on the roof, rain or shine.  A tent didn’t sound like a good idea; beyond the fact that it would have to be dried out after every rain (we didn’t miss the days of drying a tent – that’s for sure!), he was pretty sure the roof wouldn’t handle the weight very well.

 

Morning in our diy hard sided roof top camper at Anticline Overlook in Canyon Rims Recreation Area, Utah

Morning at Anticline Overlook in Canyon Rims Recreation Area, Utah

After a lot of research (mostly focusing on the roof-top campers used by people in the Outback of Australia), he had a stroke of genius: why not buy a cheap truck cap, mount it on plywood, and then attach it to roof racks on top of the van?

 

Inside the hard sided roof top camper...the sleepers are still inside their sleeping bags :-)  This was in Big Bend National Park, Texas

Inside the roof top camper…the sleepers are still inside their sleeping bags :-) This was in Big Bend NP, TX.  BTW, the blue is hard foam insulation we fitted for the inside for winter trips.  We cut holes for the windows, which is necessary for ventilation (you can see the sunrise through the hole).

It worked!  And it cost a fraction of a professionally built hard sided roof top camper, not to mention the shipping cost to send it from Australia! Including all the hardware, etc., I think we paid $104 for everything on the first build.

 

Yes, there was a second build…he’d planned on a short-term solution (hopefully to get us through a couple years), but that was 2006.  Since we’re still using it, we had to do a few major repairs on it once (since it wasn’t supposed to last this long, we added some better hardware, wood, etc., a couple years back).

 

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So here it is…a DIY hard sided roof top camper…or as we’ve come to call it, our “roof top hotel”.

 

Materials for a DIY Hard Sided Roof Top Camper

Note: Before you get too far, you may want to weigh your materials and get roof racks that can handle the weight.  We had some trouble finding roof racks – let alone affordable roof racks – that were made for more weight than a canoe.  Also , you might want to check and make sure that your vehicle can handle the weight, as well.

 

Making the base for the roof top camper

Making the base for the rooftop camper

1 used truck cap – ours measured about the width of the top of the van.  We picked up ours at a local junkyard for about $50.  Now, I’d pick one up on Craigslist for free or very little $.

½ thick plywood – cut to the size just slightly less than the size of the bottom of the truck cap.  (You will likely end up needing more than once piece to cover the entire floor of the truck cap.)

1 x 2 ½ in. furring strips – put around the outside of the pieces of plywood (on what would be the bottom of the hard sided roof top camper).  Then put strips laterally along where you expect the roof racks to be (1 foot from each end and one in the very middle for us).  Then put spacers between the lateral strips for structural soundness. (See the diagram – I haven’t explained it very well.)  We used flat-head screws to attach the strips to the plywood.

 

Diagram of the furring strip placements on the plywood base for our diy hard sided roof top camper

Diagram of the furring strip placements on the plywood base

We then coated the whole thing with water-repellent wood preservative.

 

Next, we placed the truck cap on top of the plywood base.  We caulked between the cap and the plywood base using rope calk
to keep the water from coming in if it rained.  It’s worked pretty well, although after the revisions it’s leaked a bit more so we’ve had to be more careful.  Then screw it down with wood screws.  (The reason for using wood screws rather than, say, carriage bolts was because we wanted to make as few holes as possible.)  We put more rope calk around the outside at this point; this was perfectly waterproof the first time, at least.  We always take rope calk with us so if something begins to leak, we can add more calk (which has worked better or worse depending on the situation).  (Actually, our first rainstorm with the roof top hotel was in a torrential downpour in Oklahoma…although we’d hoped for a gentler rain to try it out, we figured if it could handle that, it could handle anything!)

 

Driving the Potash Road, our diy hard sided roof top camper and all! Outside of Canyonlands National Park, Utah

Driving the Potash Road, roof top camper and all!

We connected our hard sided roof top camper to three roof racks – we made those, too, using some old hardware we had lying around – by attaching the roof racks to the plywood base about 1 foot from each end and the third on in the center, placing the roof racks where we’d placed the lateral furring strips mentioned above.  We attached to the roof racks by using U-bolts around the roof racks going around the furring strips, up through the plywood base, and into the flange at the base of the cap.  In the center, we used two carriage bolts from the top through the plywood base to attach to the roof rack.  (You should be able to see some of this in the pictures.)

 

Testing out just the base before adding the truck cap to our diy hard sided roof top camper

Testing out just the base before adding the truck cap

At this point, the truck cap was too heavy for us to lift onto the van.  Even with a few strong guys around, we had major trouble lifting it high enough to get it onto the top of the van.  We had originally thought we could take it apart and reassemble it on top, but that was going to be a bit complicated.  For a few years, we’d build sand piles around the van to walk up to lift it, but again, that wasn’t a very good solution.  Finally we purchased a winch – and that works great :-)

 

Another view of testing out the base of the hard sided roof top camper.

Another view of testing out the base

We put a wind deflector in front of our hard sided roof top camper and found we saved about $0.03/gallon.  We originally purchased one from a local RV store, but ended up extending it (using lauan plywood, then coating it with weather preservative) since it really wasn’t tall enough.  We also tried to purchase a ladder for the back door so we could climb up, but since the ladder never arrived, we ended up using an old wooden ladder (just make sure it’s lightweight).  The problem with this is finding someplace to stuff it at night when we’re sleeping in the cap (sometimes we can lay it across the top of the seats in the van or underneath the van, depending on where we are and how wet the ladder is – during the day, the ladder (and a lot of our camping gear) lives inside the cap).

 

Our first wind deflector was a bit short - we used the spare tire for a spacer between the roof top camper and the deflector.  Saguaro National Park, Arizona

Our first wind deflector was a bit short – we used the spare tire for a spacer between the roof top camper and the deflector. We’re in Saguaro NP, BTW

If you use this post to make your own hard sided roof top camper, let me know!  Just leave a message in the comments below and, if you can, include a link to some pictures of your creation also in the comment field (just don’t fill in the URL field or I won’t see it!)

 

Another morning in our diy hard sided roof top camper in...well...somewhere out west...

Another morning in…well…somewhere out west…

Note: This is posted for your enjoyment and use; however, I cannot be held responsible for anything that happens while making, using, or in any other way associated with this tutorial or a roof top camper, even through negligence on my part or yours.  Using this tutorial in part or in whole means that you agree that I am not liable.

 

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Canyon Views at Canyon Rims and Celebrating 5 Years!

Views toward Dead Horse Point State Park from Canyonlands Overlook in Canyon Rims Recreation Area, Utah

Views toward Dead Horse Point State Park from Canyonlands Overlook in Canyon Rims Recreation Area

Wow!  It’s so hard to believe that it’s been 5 whole years since I started this blog.  Yep, I started posting about my crazy adventures hiking the wilderness and not-so-wilderness of the US in March of 2010.  Since then, we’ve traveled so far, shared so many memories, and began posting so many more pictures (would you believe that my first post originally didn’t include any pictures at all?!?)  Over 265 posts later, I don’t think I’ve completely run out of material…yet…but to celebrate, I thought I’d repost my very first blog entry.  It’s about a fun little wilderness park south of Moab, Utah called Canyon Rims Recreation Area.  I’ll also post a whole lot more pictures than the original and add a few comments, too :-)

 

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The La Sal Mountains from Anticline Overlook, Canyon Rims Special Management Recreation Area, Utah

The La Sal Mountains from Anticline Overlook

Canyon Rims Recreation Area (now Canyon Rims Special Recreation Management Area) is a fairly small, fairly undeveloped park that overlooks Canyonlands National Park.  It can be compared to Dead Horse State Park and Island in the Sky (Canyonlands National Park), but this is better than either one, offering stunning views of the Colorado and Green rivers and the heart of Canyonlands itself.  (Canyon Rims also lacks the crowds of Canyonlands and Dead Horse State Park.)  The park is located about thirty two miles south of Moab on Utah 191.  (Six miles north of entrance to the Needles district of Canyonlands, and twenty miles north of Monticello on Utah 191.)

 

One of the viewing areas at Anticline Overlook, Canyon Rims Special Management Recreation Area, Utah

One of the viewing areas at Anticline Overlook

The road into Canyon Rims is paved, unlike many (ok, the rest) of the roads in the park.  The rest of the roads are gravel, and which are readily accessible by a low clearance vehicle, although some sections of the road have quite a bit of washboard, which makes for slower driving, and a few roads are dirt and accessible only to those with 4×4.  Follow the paved road past one of the campgrounds (Windwhistle Campground) and to a Y in the road.  If you take the left fork, it will take you on a paved road to the Needles Overlook.

 

Views toward the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park from the Needles Overlook, Canyon Rims Special Management Recreation Area, Utah

Views toward the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park from the Needles Overlook

This is a spectacular overlook with a paved parking lot, port-a-potties, and a picnic area overlooking the Needles District of Canyonlands.  It also has some nice trails that take you around the edge of the canyon, giving you a very nice view of the needles and the rest of that part of the canyon.  It’s totally spectacular, especially around sunset.  One word of caution is that there are also a lot of steep drop offs at this overlook, with only a fence to keep you away from the edge—somehow those fences look awfully flimsy on the edge of such a drop!

 

Sunset at Needles Overlook - the fences, as sturdy as they are, look pretty flimsy on the edge of the dropoff!  Canyon Rims Special Management Recreation Area, Utah

Sunset at Needles Overlook – the fences, as sturdy as they are, look pretty flimsy on the edge of the dropoff!

If you go back and take the right fork of the road, it goes down a good gravel road to some other overlooks.  The first road off the main dirt road is on the right and goes to Hatch Point Campground (which is pretty primitive by national park standards, but not too terrible if you like the security of sleeping in a campground).

 

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The road to Miner Overlook from the top of the butte.  The La Sal Mountains are on the horizon.  Canyon Rims Special Management Recreation Area, Utah

The road to Miner Overlook from the top of the butte. The La Sal Mountains are on the horizon.

The next road off the main road is on the left and goes to Canyonlands Overlook.  This road in not as good as the main road, and is likely to be impassable to two wheel drive low clearance vehicles.  We made it most of the way down the road in a two-wheel-drive high-clearance van, but about a mile from the end of the road, the road became impassible to two wheel drive vehicles, so we walked the last mile to the overlook.

 

The road to Canyonlands Overlook...we decided walking was safer than driving!  Canyon Rims Recreation Area, Utah

The road to Canyonlands Overlook…we decided walking was safer than driving!

Another picture of the road to Canyonlands Overlook, Canyon Rims Recreation Area, Utah

Another picture of the road to Canyonlands Overlook…

And even more pictures of the road to Canyonlands Overlook, Canyon Rims Recreation Area, Utah

And even more pictures of the road to Canyonlands Overlook!

Even though it is a bad road, if you can make it out to the overlook you will be rewarded with one of the most beautiful views in the entire park (which I still agree with!).  The view allows you to see all the way from The Needles in the south to Island in the Sky to the north and The Maze to the west.  You can also see further north beyond Island in the Sky, and if you look a little bit to the northwest you can see Dead Horse Point State Park.  This overlook does not have any fences around the edges of the canyon, and it is a very long way down.  The only facility at the end of this road is a small dirt parking area and a port-a-potty.

 

Views from near the road before arriving at Canyonlands Overlook, Canyon Rims Special Management Recreation Area, Utah

Views from near the road before arriving at Canyonlands Overlook – we’re looking into Dead Horse Point State Park from the other side of the canyon.

The next overlook off the main road is on the left and goes to Miner Overlook.  This overlook is a road that goes to the edge of the canyon and loops around a butte and gives more nice views of a part of the canyon that looks more like the Grand Canyon.  It’s a great little stop with some really rewarding views.  If you climb (scramble) up onto the top of the butte that the road circles, you can look east and have a nice view of the La Sal Mountains and other rock formations to the east.

 

Scrambling up the butte at Miner Overlook, Canyon Rims Special Management Recreation Area, Utah

Scrambling up the butte at Miner Overlook

The next marked road off the main road is on the right and goes to Trough Springs, which is a hiking trial (a hiking trial?  No court of law here!) trail that descends into Kane Creek Canyon on an old cattle road.  It is 2.5 miles long and descends 1100 feet.

 

Views from on top of the butte at Miner Overlook

Views from on top of the butte at Miner Overlook

At the end of the main road is Anticline Overlook.  This overlook gives you a look at beautiful views of a different part of the canyon that has different rock formations than at the other end of the canyon.  It is a must-do for anyone who likes crazy roads: from the overlook we saw ATVs and jeeps going up and down a road that would give an engineer the shivers (and certainly inspired the aspiring engineers in the group!).  It twists and turns, and eventually crosses a butte.  You can also see the potash plant that is on the other side of Moab, and there are some educational signs about the forming of the canyon and how potash is made.  Anticline Overlook also has picnic tables and port-a-potties at it.

 

The view toward Potash from Anticline Overlook, Canyon Rims Special Management Recreation Area, Utah

The view toward Potash from Anticline Overlook

Canyon Rims Recreation Area is not very well known, but it is a must do for anyone traveling between Moab and Monticello—the views won’t let you down.

 

Views from near the road on the way to Canyonlands Overlook, Canyon Rims Special Management Recreation Area, Utah

Views from near the road on the way to Canyonlands Overlook

Entrance Fee: None

Open: All year

Closed: Some of the dirt roads may be impassible after it rains

Camping: The park has two campgrounds, one on the paved road and one on the unpaved part of the road.  Fees are $12/night (3/10) (now they’re up to $15/night), and both campgrounds have toilets, water (mid-April through late-September), and picnic tables.  Windwhistle campground has 15 sites, Hatch Point, 10.

Lodging: None.  The closest lodging is in Monticello, over 20 miles away.

 

The La Sal Mountains from the top of the butte over Miner Overlook, Canyon Rims Special Management Recreation Area, Utah

The La Sal Mountains from the top of the butte over Miner Overlook

And now for some little gadgets I’ve added over the years…

 

Road ★★★☆☆

Signs ★★☆☆☆

Scenery ★★★★★

Would I go 100 miles out of my way for this? ★★★★★

Overall Rating: ★★★★☆

 

Views from Miner Overlook, Canyon Rims Special Management Recreation Area, Utah

Views from Miner Overlook

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How to Visit the Deception Pass Bridge for Free

Looking at the Deception Pass Bridge from Pass Island, Deception Pass State Park, Washington

Looking at the Deception Pass Bridge from Pass Island

Ever since I saw my first picture of the Deception Pass Bridge in northwestern Washington, I wanted to see it in person.  There was something so uniquely interesting about the graceful spans, and knowing some of my group members pretty well, I knew a bridge would be a very welcome addition to mountains and wildflowers (and maybe even a highlight of the trip!)  But I also didn’t feel it was special enough to go a long way out of the way to see, and certainly not special enough to pay $10/day for visiting.  (If I was making a day of it, sure, but just to see the bridge?  Really???)  So I was excited – no, thrilled – when I realized that to get between the Mt. Baker area and the Olympic Peninsula we’d have to drive right across the Deception Pass Bridge!  Talking with other hikers about it, I also realized that (except for gas) we could do it 100% free…  (Of course, you can park for free if you have a Discovery Pass, which I didn’t, so then it would be free no matter which side you parked on!)

 

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A sign about Deception Pass in the parking lot of Deception Pass State Park, Washington

A sign about Deception Pass in the parking lot of the state park

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11 Amazing Trails of the West that are 1 Mile (or Less) in Length

This view is only steps from the String Lake Trailhead in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

This view is only steps from the String Lake Trailhead in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Short trails don’t have to be boring.  Nor do you have to forgo the best scenery because you can’t – or don’t want to – hike all day long, miles and miles on end.  So I thought I’d put together a list of 11 Amazing Trails of the West that are 1 Mile (or Less) – and that’s round trip!

 

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The trail to the fire tower overlooking Itasca State Park in Minnesota is also less than 1 mile RT

The trail to the fire tower overlooking Itasca State Park in Minnesota is also less than 1 mile RT

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Hidden Lake Lookout: A Most Fabulous View!

Hidden Lake from partway between the saddle and the lookout, Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest and North Cascades National Park, Washington

Hidden Lake from partway between the saddle and the lookout

Hidden Lake Lookout!  What a trail that promised much and delivered more!  The name evokes pictures in my mind of a half-frozen lake, rocky crags still studded with snow, and wildflowers galore along the trail.  Its 9.3 mile length also makes me think of partying girls and bear hunting, but more on that later.  The North Cascades certainly offer stunning scenery to the hiker who doesn’t mind a little show and a little scrambling to reach an old fire-lookout perched precariously atop a high, craggy peak.  Need I say more?

 

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Looking north from near the Hidden Lake Lookout, Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest and North Cascades National Park, Washington

Looking north from near the lookout

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Lookout Mountain – Fabulous Views of Mt. Hood!

Mt. Hood from the Lookout Mountain Loop Trail, Mount Hood National Forest, Oregon

Mount Hood from the Lookout Mountain Loop Trail

The views of Mt. Hood from Lookout Mountain are downright stunning.  And I don’t say that lightly…it’s true!  So often, it’s difficult to get far enough away from the unique mountains that you can actually enjoy their splendor.  But here, on this high hill that once boasted a fire lookout, you get to see not only Mt. Hood, but the surrounding hills and lakes making for quite the worthwhile 3 mile hike!

 

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Views from Lookout Mountain toward the plains, Mount Hood National Forest, Oregon

Views from Lookout Mountain toward the plains

I first found information about Lookout Mountain in 2010 when we were planning a trip to the greater Mt. Hood area.  We didn’t end up hiking …Read More

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A View Junkie’s Guide to Dayhiking Colorado – My First Book!

A View Junkie's Guide to Dayhiking Colorado - Front Cover

A View Junkie’s Guide to Dayhiking Colorado – Front Cover

I’ve published a book – “A View Junkie’s Guide to Dayhiking Colorado” by Anne Whiting!  After so many years of friends and family members asking us to tell them about our favorite hikes, I’ve finally compiled about 30 hikes (with options for another 30 adventures) into a hiking book.  I decided to begin with the state of Colorado, since we seem to keep ending up there…even accidentally!  So I had a fair amount of hikes to choose from!

 

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Reading A View Junkie's Guide to Dayhiking Colorado by Anne Whiting

Reading A View Junkie’s Guide to Dayhiking Colorado

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Skyline Divide: Best Views around Mt. Baker

Hiking the southern end of Skyline Divide toward Mt. Baker.  Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, Washington

Hiking the southern end of Skyline Divide toward Mt. Baker

Skyline Divide!  What can I say for the jaw-dropping views, the endless vistas, and the snowcapped peaks nearby and far away?  Every time I thought we’d gotten to the best of the best views, we crossed another high point on the ridge and were awe-struck again by the grandeur around us.  Mt. Baker is at the head of the ridge – becoming closer and grander the closer you get – and Mt. Shucksan is a couple valleys away.  Meanwhile, the Canadian Cascades are beyond the end of the ridge.  The trail length is variable, but we hit what I’d consider the best of the views just before mile 5.  We went another half mile further for a total hike of 10.1 miles (anyone else have the problem that their GPS at the end of the hike isn’t reading double the amount it was reading when you turned around?)

 

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Looking back at the Skyline Divide ridge from near where we turned around, Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, Washington

Looking back at the Skyline Divide ridge from near where we turned around

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Hiking the Bridge to the NJ/PA State Line on the AT

The Appalachian Trail crossing the I-80 Bridge across the Delaware River as the trail heads toward the NJ/PA state line, Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, Pennsylvania

The Appalachian Trail crossing the I-80 Bridge across the Delaware River as the trail heads toward the NJ/PA state line

I don’t hike the AT much, but it seems like when I do, it’s either in North Carolina or New Jersey/Pennsylvania.  I don’t know why; maybe it’s just because the AT is a convenient trail in those areas.  At any rate, a real highlight of AT hiking for me last summer was walking to the New Jersey/Pennsylvania State Line in the Delaware Water Gap.  It was especially special since the state line is in the middle of the river, so we had to cross a huge bridge, right beside I-80, to get to it!

 

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The Delaware River near the I-80 / Appalachian Trail Bridge, Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, Pennsylvania

The Delaware River

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